5 Ways to Prevent Sewer Backups

No one wants to open the shower door and find a sewage backing up the drain. Sewer backups can occur for several reasons, but usually they are preventable. The main cause of a sewer backup is a clog in your sewer line – other causes can include septic system failure and sewer line breaks. The best ways to prevent sewage backup issues include keeping your sewer lines clear and maintained – try these five tips.

  1. Keep grease and fats out of your drains. Fat and grease are responsible for many clogs in plumbing, including large clogs in your sewer lines. Grease also can cause problems with septic systems. Wipe out greasy pans before rinsing or cleaning to keep grease out of your drains.
  2. Be careful what you flush. Cotton swabs, feminine hygiene products, cotton balls and other solid items can cause clogs in your pipes and in septic systems. Keep non-biodegradable items out of the toilet.
  3. Compost hard foods. Even if you have a garbage disposal, some hard or solid foods should not be put down the drain. Start a compost for hard food items like egg shells, tough produce peels and coffee grounds to prevent clogs.
  4. Schedule preventive hydro-jetting. Debris and sludge can accumulate in your sewer lines. Hydro-jetting performed by a sewer professional can clear your sewer lines to prevent clogs.
  5. Inspect your sewer lines and maintain your septic system. Every few years, have a camera inspection performed on your sewer lines – this can identify any pipe deterioration or problems for preventive repairs. Also, if you have a septic system, make sure to schedule annual service to prevent backups.

A few preventive steps can eliminate many problems that cause sewer backups. It is worth the investment to keep your sewer lines and septic system maintained to help prevent inconvenient and expensive sewer backups.

Posted on behalf of:
Seagraves Plumbing Sewer & Septic
4980 Plant Atkinson Rd SE
Smyrna, GA 30080
(494) 792-2221

Is a Sewer Line Replacement Covered Under Homeowner Insurance?

No homeowner wants to find out they need a sewer line replaced. Not only can it mean digging up your yard and the inconvenience of no plumbing in your home until it is fixed, it is an expensive project. If you come home to a sewage backup into your home or a sink hole in your yard due to a broken sewer pipe, you need to know your options, especially when it comes to managing the cost. In some cases, you may be able to make a claim to your homeowner insurance to help pay for the repair or replacement of your sewer line.

Replacing Old Sewer Lines

If your sewer line is a few decades old and finally cracked from general wear and tear, it is unlikely that this will be covered by homeowner insurance. Pipes wear out and it is expected that they will need replacement eventually.

Check Your Policy

Whether or not you can use your homeowner insurance to help offset the cost of replacing your sewer line depends on a few different factors. What caused the damage to the sewer line is important – was it an earthquake, flood, crushed under a vehicle, or tree root invasion? Next, it depends on your policy and insurance carrier. Some situations may be covered under a general policy, but damage from natural disasters like earthquakes may require a special type of coverage. The best way to find out if you are covered is to carefully read through your policy or talk to your insurance agent.

While sewer line replacements are not cheap, it is a project that usually only needs to be done once every few decades. Talk to your local sewer line installation contractor to discuss your options to find the best way to cope with the cost.

Posted on behalf of:
Metro Septic LLC
1210 N Tennessee St
Cartersville, GA 30120
(678) 873-7934

Will My City Sewer Service Fix My Sewer Line?

When you find out you have a problem with your sewer line, you may think your first call should be to your city sewer service. After all, you pay for sewer service every month, so issues with your sewer line should be covered. However, that is rarely the case when it comes to sewer line repairs. Here’s the scoop on sewer line repairs and who is responsible for fixing pipes on your property.

Most municipal sewer services provide drainage of sewage to a local treatment plant. Homes and businesses in the city connect to a main sewer line from their buildings. However, the sewer line that runs from a home out to the main sewer line is not part of the municipal sewer system. In most cases, if a sewer pipe breaks or is clogged, it is the property owner’s responsibility to fix. Exceptions may include if the issue occurs at the connection to the city sewer line or if a backup is caused by the city sewer line.

Repairing Your Sewer Line

The first step to fixing your sewer line issue is to call in a sewer service to inspect your pipes. Your sewer professional can tell you where the problem is; if it is a city sewer line issue, they can let you know and you can contact your city utility department to report the problem. If the problem is with your side sewer pipe, you may be able to cover the cost of repair or replacement through your home insurance, depending on your coverage and what caused the damage.

When repairing a sewer line connected to a city sewer, make sure to use a qualified sewer service. Some cities require certification for sewer services that work on side sewers that are connected to the city system, so check the requirements in your area.

Posted on behalf of:
Kiddco Plumbing Inc
Sterling, VA 20166
(703) 435-4441

Protect Your Sewer Line During Utility Work

Your main sewer line may be hidden, but just under the surface of your yard it is performing its duty. Many people may not know exactly where their sewer line is, which can pose problems. If a new phone line or gas pipe needs to be installed to your home, utility workers may need to run a trench through your yard. It is vital to protect your sewer lines from damage to prevent expensive repairs down the road.

Find Your Sewer Lines

If you have a lot schematic of your property, it may show you where your sewer line runs. You may also be able to get an outline of underground utilities on your property from your local utility or building municipal departments if they have one on file. The other option is finding the outlet from your home (usually in the basement or crawlspace) and following the path to the septic tank or city sewer line.

Inform Utility Crews

Most utility crews will investigate to ensure they are not disturbing any existing utility lines before they begin digging. However, do not assume they have done their due diligence. It is not uncommon for damage to be done to sewer lines or a D-Box that is not realized until many years later. When you need to replace a sewer line because it eventually breaks from damage done years prior, you most likely will be left paying for the repair.

Concerned that a utility crew may have damaged your sewer line? Contact a local sewer line service to have your pipes inspected for damage. It is better to find out sooner than later, giving you an opportunity to have the repair done before it causes damage to your home or property.

Posted on behalf of:
Septic Service Pro, LLC
Peachtree Street NW
Atlanta, GA 30334
(678) 292-8728

Where is My Sewer Line Clean-Out?

The main sewer line that carries waste away from your home is underground, but all sewer lines should have a clean-out port. This access point is designed to give you and sewer professionals a way into the sewer line without needing to dig up the pipe, which can be useful if you have a clog or need a repair. If you do not know where your sewer line clean-out is, here are a few tips to help you find it.

Do You Have the Plot Plans for Your Home?

If you have the plot plans that were used to design and build your home, this is the easiest way to find the clean-out port for your sewer line. It should be identified on the plumbing layout, making it simple to locate the port.

Look Between Point A and Point B

Your main sewer line leaves your home at point A, and empties at point B. The empty point is either a municipal sewer line or your septic tank. The clean-out port for your sewer line will be between the two points. The clean-out is usually a small pipe with a screw on cover that is poking out of the ground. In rare cases, it could be behind a wall or in a crawl space.

Call a Sewer Professional

If you cannot find your clean-out or believe you have a sewer line clog, call your local sewer professional. They can locate your clean-out and perform an inspection on your sewer line with a digital video camera that can be snaked through your sewer line. Once you know where your clean-out is, make sure it is kept accessible for sewer line repairs and maintenance in the future.

Posted on behalf of:
Metro Septic LLC
1210 N Tennessee St
Cartersville, GA 30120
(678) 873-7934

How Can I Prevent Sewer Line Backups?

No one wants a sewer line backup in their home, but when these occur, they are often not an accident. Most sewer line backups can be prevented if you know the common causes. When more than one drain in your home is slow or sewage is coming up the drains, you have a big problem with your sewer line. It is either clogged or blocked, leaving no where for the waste to go but up your drains. Here are some ways you can prevent a sewer line backup to keep this from happening in your home.

Protect Your Sewer Line

If your sewer breaks under pressure or becomes clogged with tree roots, you are likely to have a sewer line backup. Protect your sewer line from becoming damaged. Keep vehicles off your lawn where your sewer line runs and do not plant trees near your sewer line. This can help prevent pressure damage to the pipe from heavy vehicles and keep tree roots out of your sewer line.

Watch What Goes Down the Drain

Educate the people in your home on what can and cannot go down the drain. Not only can grease, hair, soap, food debris and non-biodegradable items create indoor plumbing clogs, they can become part of the sludge that can create blockages in your main sewer line. Do not flush plastics, cotton or cardboard – use a garbage disposal for food waste and strainers in all drains to collect hair and other items so they do not go down the drains.

If you do have a sewer line backup, call a local sewer professional to perform an inspection. Often all that is needed is a hydro jetting service to clear your sewer line, unless it is damaged. Either way, they can fix the problem and put an end to the sewer backup in your home.

Posted on behalf of:
Seagraves Plumbing Sewer & Septic
4980 Plant Atkinson Rd SE
Smyrna, GA 30080
(494) 792-2221

Should You Replace Your Main Sewer Line?

The main sewer pipe or line that whisks your home’s waste away to a septic system or city sewer can last for decades. Many old sewer lines still exist that were made from clay, lead, concrete or metal, first installed forty, fifty or more years ago. While these pipes have done their duty, they are more likely to have problems in the future. If you have one of these older types of sewer lines, is it time for replacement?

You may think if there is not a problem, why fix it? True – you can wait for a problem to arise and then replace the pipe if needed. That day may come sooner than you think. If a sewer line is over thirty years old and made from a material that deteriorates like metal, concrete or clay, the day may come when there is a large sewage pool in your yard, or a sewage backup into your home. Or, you could proactively replace your old sewer line now before you have a sewage emergency stinking up your home.

Replacement Options

Most sewer lines now are made from PVC or plastic. These will not corrode from moisture or age, and they tend to withstand tree roots invasion better than the older types of pipe. Once in place, it is unlikely that you will need to repair or replace your sewer line again in your lifetime, so it is a wise investment.

If you are not sure what type of sewer line you have, you can get yours inspected by your local sewer service company. They can do a camera inspection to check the inside of your sewer line to determine the type and condition and give you options for replacement, if needed.

Posted on behalf of:
Seagraves Plumbing Sewer & Septic
4980 Plant Atkinson Rd SE
Smyrna, GA 30080
(494) 792-2221

Warning Signs Your Main Sewer Line is Clogged

Under your yard, large sewer pipes sweep away waste from your home. Whether you have a septic system or are connected to a municipal sewer system, these sewer lines are critical to keep your plumbing working correctly. Many homeowners can go years, even decades, without any problems with their sewer lines, especially if they keep up with maintenance. However, clogs and do form and when they do, they can cause a sewer backup into your home. Here are some of the warning signs that you may have a clog forming in your main sewer line.

  • Slow drains. If you notice more than one drain in your home is slow, it could be a clog in your sewer line. It usually begins with the drains closest to the sewer line outlet in the lower levels of the home. If only one drain is slow, it is more likely a localized clog in your plumbing.
  • Bad odors. When you smell sewage near your drains or in your yard, you may have a sewer line clog. Sewage may be trapped in the pipes and the fumes can come up through your sink and shower drains.
  • Wet spot in the yard. If a tree root has clogged your sewer line, it could also cause a leak in the pipe, letting sewage out into the soil. This can cause a wet area in the yard or a green spot in your lawn.

If you have any signs of a sewer line clog, don’t hesitate to call your sewer professional. Clearing it before it gets worse can prevent a sewer backup in your home and the damage that it can create. Many sewer line clogs can be swiftly removed with hydro-jetting by your local sewer service company.

Posted on behalf of:
Metro Septic LLC
1210 N Tennessee St
Cartersville, GA 30120
(678) 873-7934

Is a Trenchless Sewer Line Right for Your Septic Repair?

If you have a broken sewer line in your septic system, you may be wondering if a trenchless sewer line repair is a good option. No one relishes the thought of tearing up their yard to replace sewer lines, which is why trenchless pipe repairs can sound like a good option. However, there are some factors to consider before you choose a trenchless sewer line versus traditional pipe replacement.

Trenchless sewer line repairs are attractive to homeowners. They do not require the broken pipe be dug up with a trench. Instead, a pipe lining or soft-lined pipe is put in place of the broken pipe. This only involves digging two holes on either side of the broken pipe instead of a trench. This can save landscaping and take less time. However, there are some drawbacks to this method. Some factors that can be a problem include:

  • The grade or slope of the pipe needs to be just right. Pipe lining or trenchless pipe replacements require the right slope or pitch to work correctly.
  • Pipe bursting can cause disruption and damage to other structures underground. Pipe bursting is used when the pipe is being replaced using a trenchless method; if underground utilities are too close, the bursting action could cause damage to this equipment.
  • Unforeseen complications can result in a trench method to be needed, causing further delay and cost.

While trenchless pipe replacement or repair can be beneficial in some situations, it is not the solution for all sewer pipe repairs. Traditional sewer line repairs may require a trench, but many issues can be avoided with this method. Talk to your local sewer/septic repair services about which method is best for your sewer line repair.

Posted on behalf of:
Kiddco Plumbing Inc
Sterling, VA 20166
(703) 435-4441

Why You Should Replace Polybutylene Pipes

Sometimes an invention comes along that seems like a great idea, but turns out to be a literal bust. That is the case with polybutylene pipes, which was used in plumbing between the 1970’s and 1990’s. This blue plastic piping was very popular, thought to be the wave of the future. It turned out it is unreliable and will eventually corrode from the inside out, causing plumbing and sewer line failures. If you have polybutylene pipes in your plumbing or as your sewer line, you should replace it. Here’s why.

Repairs Will Get Expensive

Many home and business owners have opted to repair polybutylene pipes as they burst versus doing a full replacement. While this is less expensive at the time, it will not be in the long run. Running up plumbing and sewer line repairs at a few hundred dollars or more per episode will eventually cost more than replacement, which will need to be done anyway.

Possible Damage

If your sewer line breaks or a pipe bursts in your home, you can be in for expensive damage to your house and property. A broken sewer line can cause a sewer backup, creating a nasty mess, plus possible water and mold problem in your home.

It’s Not if They Will Break, It Is When

If your polybutylene pipes have not already begun to give you problems, they will. Proactively replacing polybutylene pipes will save you on repairs and damage.

Don’t wait for the next plumbing or sewer line emergency to occur. Talk to your local sewer/plumbing service company about replacing your old polybutylene pipes to protect yourself from emergency repair costs and other damage to your property.

Posted on behalf of:
Bynum & Sons Plumbing, Inc.
2120 McDaniels Bridge Rd SW
Lilburn, GA 30047
(770) 736-8283