3 Things You Need Before Installing a New Septic System

A new septic system is a large undertaking; months of planning often occur before the system can finally be installed. The land must be perc’d, inspected and permits must be obtained to begin the final process. Septic systems require the right distance from the home, soil that will allow for filtration and the pipes in place for waste transportation. There are many steps that must accomplished before the system can be completed. Here are three of the things you will need before your septic system can be installed.

  1. Layout. A layout plan is needed to prepare for your septic system installation. This is like a blueprint for a home, outlining the different components of the septic. The layout will show where the pipes, tank, drain field and distribution box will be located. Keep in mind the trees and landscaping that are in place that could interfere with your plumbing.
  2. Permits. You will need permits from your county or city for your septic system. Your septic system installation company can often help with this process. An inspection is usually required before permits will be issued.
  3. Tank size. Before you can install your system, you need to decide what size tank will be needed for your home. You want a tank that will be large enough for your current and future needs. Your septic professional can help you decide what size you need.

Of course, these three steps are just a few of the many factors that should be considered before installation. Having a professional septic company to help you navigate the preparation process will make sure that your installation goes smoothly and your system will last for many years to come.

Posted on behalf of:
Septic Service Pro, LLC
Peachtree Street NW
Atlanta, GA 30334
(678) 292-8728

Is it a Septic Problem?

Your plumbing and septic system are connected, but there is a difference between a plumbing issue and a septic problem. Your plumbing refers to the pipes and water system inside the house, while your septic system involves waste pipes, your septic tank and drain field. However, both can cause drain issues and sewer backups in your home. How do you know when you just have a clogged drain or if it’s a septic problem?

When a drain or pipe is clogged in your plumbing, it is usually a localized issue. If your toilet or kitchen sink drain is clogged, only those fixtures are affected. Your toilet can overflow due to a clog, but the bathroom sink and shower will still drain. These are clogs in the smaller pipes. Larger plumbing waste pipes can get clogged, but they will still usually only affect one area of the house, not all drains.

A septic backup will affect all drains in your home, usually the ones closest to the main sewer drain pipe first. This means drains in your basement or first floor are most likely to be the first to drain slower. If there is a septic backup, eventually all drains in the home will become slow and may begin not draining at all, or sewage may come up through the drains.

Any sewer backup in your home is a good reason to call a plumber. However, if you have what appears to be a septic backup, you want to call a septic professional. Your septic tank could be full or you may be experiencing a septic failure. Your local septic professional can perform an inspection and figure out the problem and propose a solution.

Posted on behalf of:
Metro Septic LLC
1210 N Tennessee St
Cartersville, GA 30120
(678) 873-7934

How Often Should You Have Your Septic Inspected?

When you buy a home with a septic system, an inspection is usually performed before the sale is finalized. Same is true when a new septic is added to a home; it is inspected before it is approved for use. However, outside these circumstances, how often should you have your septic inspected?

Your septic system has many different components, the majority of which are underground. It is difficult and unsafe to try inspecting the tank yourself – it is also almost impossible to know what is going on in your sewer lines without professional help. Like any major system, inspections can catch issues, such as components that need repair or replacement, before they cause extensive and expensive problems.

Septic inspections should be done once a year as part of your maintenance program. Your local septic service can perform a thorough septic inspection, which may include:

  • Checking septic tank levels
  • Measuring scum and sludge layers in the tank
  • Inspect tank for cracks or other damage
  • Check drain field and distribution box for proper function
  • Sewer line camera inspections
  • Check connections and function

Inspecting the septic tank is dangerous due to the gases inside the tank. It is important that this is performed by a professional for safety.

Once a thorough inspection is performed, your septic professional can give you an overview of your system. If this is done annually, you can catch small issues before they cause a sewer back up (like a clog forming in a sewer line) or septic failure if there are issues in your drain field or tank. Keeping up with regular annual inspections can help extend the life of your septic system and prevent expensive septic emergencies.

Posted on behalf of:
Seagraves Plumbing Sewer & Septic
4980 Plant Atkinson Rd SE
Smyrna, GA 30080
(494) 792-2221

How to Tell if your Sump Pump Needs Repair

Ironically, sump pumps are put in to prevent a flooding emergency, but they can sometimes cause the emergency. Since sump pumps are not necessarily used year-round, they can be easily forgotten when it comes to maintenance and repair. However, if your sump pump does not work when it is needed, you could be in for a flooded basement that can cost you plenty in damage and repairs, both on the sump pump and your home. Here are some tips to keep your sump pump maintained and how to know when it needs a repair.

  • Beware of bad odors. A bad odor coming from your basement may be sign that your sump pump repair. Check your sump pump – if the odor is especially bad in that area, you need to call your sewer/septic plumber for an inspection and possible repair.
  • Flooding. Obviously if your basement has any flooding, your sump pump may not be working correctly. Call your local sewer plumber for a repair.
  • Strange noises. If the sump pump is making more noise than usual or sounds like it is struggling, it is time for a service. It may just need a little tune-up on the motor or other regular maintenance, but it is better to be proactive and get it serviced before it quits running altogether or needs an emergency repair.
  • Keep your sump pump maintained. Schedule regular service for your sump pump, especially before the wettest seasons of the year.

Don’t wait for your sump pump to breakdown. Watch for signs that it needs repair and have regular maintenance performed to prevent sump pump emergencies. Talk to your local sewer/septic plumber about scheduling your next inspection or maintenance service.

Posted on behalf of:
Kiddco Plumbing Inc
Sterling, VA 20166
(703) 435-4441

Why You Should Replace Polybutylene Pipes

Sometimes an invention comes along that seems like a great idea, but turns out to be a literal bust. That is the case with polybutylene pipes, which was used in plumbing between the 1970’s and 1990’s. This blue plastic piping was very popular, thought to be the wave of the future. It turned out it is unreliable and will eventually corrode from the inside out, causing plumbing and sewer line failures. If you have polybutylene pipes in your plumbing or as your sewer line, you should replace it. Here’s why.

Repairs Will Get Expensive

Many home and business owners have opted to repair polybutylene pipes as they burst versus doing a full replacement. While this is less expensive at the time, it will not be in the long run. Running up plumbing and sewer line repairs at a few hundred dollars or more per episode will eventually cost more than replacement, which will need to be done anyway.

Possible Damage

If your sewer line breaks or a pipe bursts in your home, you can be in for expensive damage to your house and property. A broken sewer line can cause a sewer backup, creating a nasty mess, plus possible water and mold problem in your home.

It’s Not if They Will Break, It Is When

If your polybutylene pipes have not already begun to give you problems, they will. Proactively replacing polybutylene pipes will save you on repairs and damage.

Don’t wait for the next plumbing or sewer line emergency to occur. Talk to your local sewer/plumbing service company about replacing your old polybutylene pipes to protect yourself from emergency repair costs and other damage to your property.

Posted on behalf of:
Bynum & Sons Plumbing, Inc.
2120 McDaniels Bridge Rd SW
Lilburn, GA 30047
(770) 736-8283

How to Tell if your Sump Pump Needs Repair

Your sump pump can work tirelessly year-round, kicking on when needed to keep the water level around your basement low to avoid flooding. However, like any mechanical equipment, it will not last forever. The last thing you want is for your sump pump to fail when you need it the most, causing flooding in your basement. In most cases, there are signs that your sump pump is struggling before it quits altogether. Here are signs to watch for to get it repaired or replaced before it leads to water damage in your home.

  • Abnormal sounds. In most cases, sump pumps are quiet and don’t make much noise. When you start hearing your sump pump turn on, getting louder or making strange sounds like grinding or rattling, you should get it inspected.
  • Running longer. It is normal for your sump pump to turn on more often when there is heavy precipitation, but it should not be continuously running. If it is running for longer periods or seems to rarely turn off, something may be wrong, even if it is still removing water.
  • Odors. If your basement has a foul odor, especially near the sump pump, there may be something amiss.
  • Water intrusion. The last sign is the most obvious – water intrusion into your basement. Even if the sump pump is still working, it is not working efficiently enough to stop flooding.

If you have any of these signs, call your local plumber or sewer service company to have your sump pump inspected and serviced. It may just need routine service or could need a repair or replacement. It is less expensive to proactively repair the pump than to pay for repairing water damage, so it is worth the money to pay for a professional repair.

Posted on behalf of:
Kiddco Plumbing Inc
Sterling, VA 20166
(703) 435-4441

New Home Septic Inspection Checklist

If you are buying a new home with a septic system, an inspection is usually required as part of the process. You want to be aware of any possible septic problems before you buy since replacing a septic system can be a large expense. While there are certain areas that must be checked for any septic inspection, you want to ensure the company you choose to do the inspection is thorough. Here are some of the areas that should be on the septic tank inspection to ensure you have a comprehensive overview of the septic system function in your new potential home.

  • Pump the tank. For a thorough inspection, the tank should be emptied before the evaluation begins.
  • Inspect the inside of the tank. Once the tank is pumped, the walls and floor should be inspected to detect any cracks or damage.
  • Septic tank lid. The lid needs to be checked for any damage and to ensure its placement meets local regulations or if it needs a riser. The lid should provide a complete seal and service openings should meet regulations
  • Ground inspection. Doing a complete inspection of the ground around the tank, distribution box and drain field should be performed to identify any possible leaks. Wet ground, pooling or erosion can be signs of a leak.
  • Components. There are many components that need to work properly. Some components that should be checked include: baffles, filters, runback water flow from drain field, and water flow from the home.

Making sure the septic system in your potential new home is working properly and has no signs of possible failure is important to your purchasing decision. Make sure you choose a septic service company that includes all these factors in their inspection for the most comprehensive evaluation.

Posted on behalf of:
Bynum & Sons Plumbing, Inc.
2120 McDaniels Bridge Rd SW
Lilburn, GA 30047
(770) 736-8283

What Is a Biomat?

Many people who own homes with a septic system are not familiar with the various components of their system. It is not uncommon for a homeowner not to know where their septic tank or drain field is, even though this is important information to know. However, knowing where your system components are located and what to look for if there is a problem is important to prevent complete septic failure. One of these elements is a biomat.

If you are unfamiliar with a biomat, that may be a good thing. A biomat is something you do not want to occur if you have a septic system. To understand what a biomat is and why it is a sign of a septic problem, you need to know how your drain field works.

Drain Fields and Biomats

Your drain field is used to filter the waste water that comes from your septic tank. The effluent or waste water comes through a distribution box from the tank and is slowly spread over the drain field area through small underground pipes. If the soil is not allowing the water to go down fast enough or too many solids are in the effluent when it reaches the drain field, a bacteria-created layer is created called a biomat. This covers the ground and can prevent waste water from entering the soil to be filtered, causing a pooling of waste water and a septic backup.

Biomats don’t occur overnight. If there is an issue with the drain field, often there will be pooling water, a bad odor or abnormal plant growth in the area. This is the time to call your septic professional for an inspection to get the problem fixed before it becomes a full septic failure.

Posted on behalf of:
Metro Septic LLC
1210 N Tennessee St
Cartersville, GA 30120
(678) 873-7934

Top 3 Signs of a Main Sewer Line Clog

Like smaller plumbing pipes can become clogged, so can your main sewer line. The difference is that when the small pipe under your bathroom sink is clogged, only your sink doesn’t drain properly and the pipe can be easily accessed. When your main sewer line is clogged, it can back up sewer into all the drains in your home and the pipe is underground, not easily to reach. You want to catch sewer line clogs as soon as possible before you have a large sewage back-up issue. Here are three signs you may be forming a clog in your main sewer line so you can get it fixed before it becomes a larger problem.

  1. Slow drains. When more than one of your sinks is slow to drain, this can mean there is a problem with your main sewer line. It is more common for the drains closest to your main sewer line to be the slowest if there is a clog.
  2. Bad smell. If there is an odor you can’t seem to find, try smelling your drains. If any have a sewage odor, you may have a clog forming that is causing sewage to stay in the pipes.
  3. Overflowing toilets or washers. Is there still water in the bottom of the dishwasher when you open it and toilets seem to be “clogging” all the time? This may not be localized if you are having multiple problems at once; it could be your main sewer line.

If you notice any of these signs, call your local plumber that handles sewer line clogs or repairs. They can inspect your plumbing and sewer lines for clogs to find the problem and get the issue resolved.

Posted on behalf of:
Seagraves Plumbing Sewer & Septic
4980 Plant Atkinson Rd SE
Smyrna, GA 30080
(494) 792-2221

Why You Should Proactively Hydro-Jet Your Sewer Lines

It is common to put most sewer or septic issues out of mind until there’s a problem. It is not something you see or want to see, so unless it creates an issue in your home, it is usually forgotten. However, a little proactive maintenance can go a long way in preventing sewer line clogs and backups that can be inconvenient, nasty and expensive. Here are some reasons why you should proactively hydro-jet your sewer lines to keep them clear of clogs.

  • Trees love sewer lines. If you have trees in your yard, their roots would love to find their way into your sewer line. The moisture inside attracts roots to infiltrate sewer lines. Hydro-jetting can remove any small roots that have made their way inside and clear them before they cause a clog or broken pipe.
  • Remove sludge. Almost every sewer line has a certain amount of sludge that accumulates over time. While it may not be clogging the pipe now, it can eventually become thick enough to cause a backup. Clearing it out regularly can avoid sludge buildup and clogs.
  • Proactive repairs. When you have your sewer lines hydro-jetted, your sewer service can also do an inspection of the pipes. This is done with a digital camera that can be fed down through the line. This can reveal any potential problems so you can get them fixed before they cause a sewer line emergency.

Add sewer line hydro-jetting to your list of household maintenance that you do once a year. It is worth the time and investment to avoid costly and inconvenient sewer line clogs and other repairs when you least expect it.

Posted on behalf of:
Septic Service Pro, LLC
Peachtree Street NW
Atlanta, GA 30334
(678) 292-8728