Does Your Insurance Cover Sewer Line Replacement?

When you realize you have a broken sewer line, the first thing to run through your mind may be the cost. Sewer line repairs or replacement are expensive – it can cost thousands of dollars to fix a sewer line problem. One way to mitigate the cost is to find out whether your homeowner’s insurance could cover some or all your sewer line repair.

Not all homeowner’s insurance covers sewer line repairs, but some have limited coverage. If the sewer pipe breaks due to a natural disaster, damage from weight or other accidental incidents, there is a chance that the replacement may be covered under some insurance plans. You would need to check with your homeowner’s policy and read the fine print regarding these special types of repairs or talk to your insurance agent. However, there are some causes of damage that are most always NOT covered under insurance, like wear and tear or damage to the sewer line connection to the city main line.

If you do not have sewer line replacement on your homeowner’s insurance, you may be looking at paying for your repair out-of-pocket. If you have not had a sewer line problem yet, call your insurance agent. Find out if coverage is available for your sewer lines to protect you in case of accidental damage.

Keep in mind that sewer lines will eventually need replacement due to normal wear and tear. It is better to be proactive and replace old pipes that are beginning to deteriorate before they cause a sewer backup and need emergency replacement. Schedule an inspection of your sewer lines to make sure they are clear and in good condition as part of your regular home maintenance.

Posted on behalf of:
Bynum & Sons Plumbing, Inc.
2120 McDaniels Bridge Rd SW
Lilburn, GA 30047
(770) 736-8283

Distance Between a Private Well and Septic Tank

When planning to add both a well and a septic tank to the same piece of property, it is important to make accommodations for distance. Contamination of drinking water from sewage can be deadly. If you are building a new home or business with both a private well and septic system, here are some considerations to keep in mind.

Ample Distance

Every local environmental agency may have their own rules and regulations, but there are some basic standards that can be used when planning wells and septic systems. The tank should be at least fifty feet from the well, while drain fields should be at least 100 feet from the well. However, you should always check your local regulations to ensure you are meeting the standards for your region.

Plan Before Your Build

Determining where the well and septic tank/drain field should be determined before you build. You must have the right spots for a well and for a drain field – not all ground will perc for a drain field, nor is it easy to sink a well. It is easier to find the right places for these systems and then plan the spot for your building.

Professional Advice

Your local septic service company can be of great service to you as you plan the plumbing for your new building. They can do the necessary testing to find the best spot for your drain field and septic tank, and they will know the local regulations on placement regarding water wells. Their advice in the planning stages can help save you time and money to ensure you meet all the local regulations and protect the quality of your water.

Posted on behalf of:
Metro Septic LLC
1210 N Tennessee St
Cartersville, GA 30120
(678) 873-7934

What Size of Septic Tank Do You Need?

When you are adding a septic system to your property for your home, the size of septic tank you use will be important. Not only are there building and environmental regulations that you must meet – building codes require certain size tanks based on the size of the home – but you want to plan for future needs as well. Here are some considerations to keep in mind when determining what size septic tank is needed for your home.

Most residential septic tanks range from between 750 and 1250 gallons. The specifications in most building codes look at the size of the home and number of bedrooms, since there is no way to know for sure how many people will live in the home. A smaller tank of 750 gallons is designed for a home with one or two bedrooms and less than 1,500 square feet. Larger homes with three or four bedrooms may need a 1250-gallon tank or larger.

However, meeting the minimum requirements is not all you should consider. If you plan on having a full household or entertaining many guests, a bigger tank may be needed. And, you want to plan for any additions you may make in the future – adding more rooms could require you to put in a larger tank. It will save money to have a larger tank installed from the beginning.

If you are not sure what size of septic tank you should use for your home, talk to your local septic service company. They can help you determine the best size and material to use for your new septic tank, as well as the right placement and installation.

Posted on behalf of:
Seagraves Plumbing Sewer & Septic
4980 Plant Atkinson Rd SE
Smyrna, GA 30080
(494) 792-2221

Is Adding Yeast to Your Septic Tank a Good Idea?

If you own a septic system, you may be looking for ways to help keep it in good working condition. This is a good idea – septic failure and replacement can be very expensive. There are many tips you can read online on how to maintain your septic system – some good, some not so good. One you may come across is using baking yeast to help the bacteria in your tank breakdown solids.

The theory behind using yeast in your septic tank is simple. Baker’s yeast contains bacteria that does not need oxygen to thrive. When added to a septic tank, it can help breakdown starches, one of the many components in waste that is added to your tank. If solids are broken down more effectively, you may need to have your tank pumped less frequently.

So, can adding yeast be beneficial? In some cases, yes. But it needs to be done correctly and not too often. Like all good things, a little is good, too much can be a problem. To add yeast to your septic tank, follow these steps:

  • Put about 4-5 teaspoons of yeast in about 3 cups of warm, not hot, water.
  • Add 2 cups of sugar and 2 cups of cornmeal
  • Stir until yeast is dissolved. Cover and let the mixture become “frothy”
  • Flush down the toilet – flush twice to make sure everything goes down

You can do this about every 6 months. However, this does not replace regular maintenance and pumping on your septic system. Schedule regular service with your septic service company to maintain the equipment in your septic system and to perform regular pumping for the best care and maintenance of your system.

Posted on behalf of:
Septic Service Pro, LLC
Peachtree Street NW
Atlanta, GA 30334
(678) 292-8728

Tips to Keep your Septic System in Shape

To keep your body in shape, you need to eat right and exercise on a consistent basis. For septic systems, keeping them in good shape takes a similar type of commitment. What you put into your septic tank will affect what comes out and how efficient it performs its job. Unlike your body, making it work harder will not get you better results. Here are some to tips to maintain your septic system for optimum performance.

Monitor What Goes Down the Drain

There are some items that should be kept out of your septic system. In the bathroom, items like feminine hygiene products, “flushable” wipes, cotton balls/swabs and other non-biodegradable products should not be flushed down. In the kitchen, avoid coffee grounds, peelings, egg shells and fats/oils going down the drain. Also, do not pour paints or other chemicals into your garage sink.

Limit Water Use

Be efficient with how much water you use in your home. Add water efficient fixtures to your home to help reduce water waste. Teach your kids and other family members to conserve water by not running it down the drain when brushing teeth, rinsing dishes or doing other household chores.

Schedule Regular Service

Keep your septic system in tip-top shape with annual service from your local septic service company. This ensures your tank gets pumped when needed; plus, it ensure all the equipment and components are in good condition to perform the needed work in the year ahead.

Just watching what you put into your septic and a little scheduled maintenance can make a big difference on the health of your septic system. It will help prevent failure or backups while extending the life span of your system.

Posted on behalf of:
Kiddco Plumbing Inc
Sterling, VA 20166
(703) 435-4441

3 Things You Should Never Flush Down the Toilet

If you have a home or business with a septic system, the toilet can be the nemesis of maintaining your system. Too often, items that can clog your filters or caused damage to your septic end up getting flushed down. Ask any septic technician that has been called to handle septic emergencies what causes the biggest problems and it is often things that are flushed down the toilet. Here are three things you should never flushed down the toilet if you want to avoid problems down the road.

  1. Plastics. Nothing made from plastic should enter your septic system. Unfortunately, there are many items that get used in the bathroom that are made from plastics and end up in the toilet. Feminine hygiene products, cotton swabs, prophylactics, bandages and other items should not be flushed, but thrown away.
  2. “Flushable” wipes. They may say they are flushable, but these wipes should not be disposed of down the toilet in homes with septic systems. Most of these wet wipes are not bio-degradable and can clog up your septic system.
  3. Cat litter. Most cat litter is made from sand and clay, substances that can clog pipes and create excess sludge in your septic tank. Keep cat litter out of the toilet to avoid plumbing and septic problems.

If you own a septic system, you do not want anything that will not breakdown to be flushed down the toilet. Urine, human waste and septic-friendly toilet paper should be the only items that go into the toilet. Keeping other items out can help protect your septic system and avoid emergency calls to your septic service company.

Posted on behalf of:
Septic Service Pro, LLC
Peachtree Street NW
Atlanta, GA 30334
(678) 292-8728

Why You Should Install an Indoor Septic Tank Alarm

Do you have an indoor septic tank alarm? If you have a gravity system, you may not need one. Gravity does a great job of emptying your septic tank as needed. As long as you have regular service and inspections to determine when your tank needs to be pumped, you should not have a problem. However, other systems that rely on pumps to push waste out should have an alarm to let you know when there is a problem.

Mound or uphill systems require mechanisms to push waste out of your septic tank as needed. If something should fail or there is a blockage, the tank can quickly become full. If not corrected, the tank will overflow, causing a backup of sewage into your home or business. This can cause extensive damage and cost plenty in cleanup and repairs.

An indoor septic tank alarm alerts you to when the septic tank on your property is at dangerous levels. There can be many reasons the alarm goes off – you may have had excessive use or a piece of equipment is not working as it should. Whatever the cause, the alarm lets you know that there is a problem. Having it installed indoors will let you know as soon as possible when you need to investigate an issue with your septic system.

While it is possible for an alarm to sound when there is not an overflow, this is unlikely. In most cases, if your septic alarm goes off, you should call your local septic service company for an inspection. This can help mitigate the problem before it becomes a septic failure or backup that can cost you much more in repairs.

Posted on behalf of:
Seagraves Plumbing Sewer & Septic
4980 Plant Atkinson Rd SE
Smyrna, GA 30080
(494) 792-2221

Is it Possible to Move a Septic Tank?

When a septic system is put in place, it is meant to last for decades. The position of the tank and drain field is carefully designed to best suit the property and building it serves. However, down the road, the property owner may decide that they want to build or make changes to the property. When that happens, the septic tank could be a hindrance.

While it is not a simple task, septic tanks can be moved. This involves digging up the tank, disconnecting pipes and putting in a new tank at a different location. New pipes will need to be added to connect the building with the new tank and to divert waste water to the drain field.

There are considerations that must be factored in when deciding to move a septic tank. Some old cement tanks may not survive the move. They can break or crumble when removed, requiring disposal of the old tank and purchasing a new tank for the revised location. In some cases, a larger tank may be needed, especially if the reason for moving the tank is to make room for additions to the home. For gravity systems, the right amount of downgrade is needed for proper drainage in the pipes leading to and from the tank. Everything will need to be re-fitted and secured once the new tank is in place to ensure proper function.

Before deciding to move a septic tank, have an inspection done by your local septic service and installation pro. They can help you determine the best options for moving your septic tank to accommodate your new project and give you a quote on the moving costs.

Posted on behalf of:
Metro Septic LLC
1210 N Tennessee St
Cartersville, GA 30120
(678) 873-7934

Sump and Ejector Pump Maintenance

If you have a sump or ejector pump in your home, you rely on it to work as needed without fail. Sump pumps need to turn on when water levels rise and ejector pumps should be managing the flow of sewage up to the main sewer line. To ensure your pumps are working properly, regular maintenance and inspections are required. While you may not have the skills to maintain the motors of these pumps, you can perform regular inspections to ensure they are doing their jobs. Here are a few things to check.

  • Inspect the cover to ensure it is secure and tight; this cover should be child-proof for safety. Look for any issues with the seal or cracks in the cover.
  • Check for any evidence of leaks or overflows. If there was a backup or overflow, you may see water stains, smell odor or see particles left from the overflow.
  • Look for any damage to the reservoir basin like cracks, holes or other issues. The lid should fit tightly and the basin should not show any signs of leakage.
  • Check the basin for any debris. Large chunks of wood, fabric or other debris can clog the pump and cause a backup.
  • Inspect to make sure there are no exposed wires or openings to the tank or pumping chamber that need repair.

Doing regular inspections of your pumps can alert you if there is a problem so you can have it fixed before it causes a backup. In addition, schedule annual tune-ups and service for your pumps by a qualified sewer service to keep your equipment in good working order to prevent failure.

Posted on behalf of:
Kiddco Plumbing Inc
Sterling, VA 20166
(703) 435-4441

Should You Repair or Replace Your Sewer Pipes?

Like any plumbing, your sewer lines will not last forever. While many can function properly for decades, eventually they can break, crack or crumble, causing a sewage leak or blockage. When you have a sewer line problem, the first inclination may be to just repair the pipe. However, there are times when replacement may be a better option.

Depending on the type of sewer pipes you have, you can experience different types of problems within the lines underground. For pipes with joints, tree roots can infiltrate the joints and bust apart the seams. In some cases, the joints can become corroded or come apart due to pressure from above. Cast iron, cement or clay sewer lines that were commonly used in homes built before the 1970’s often are the cause of sewer pipe failures.

When you have older pipes like those listed above, it may be best to replace the pipes versus repair. Sewer pipes that are fifty years old or older are likely to continue having problems. The material can become to corrode and crumble; shifts in the soil over the years can break them apart. If you have large trees on your property, they are often the cause of issues, with roots seeking the moisture inside your sewer lines. Replacing with seamless piping or other options can reduce further issues, saving money and mess down the road.

If you have newer sewer lines, repair is often the better choice. One cracked pipe can be fixed for much less money, a better option if the rest of the piping is still in good shape. Your local sewer service company can help you determine your options and give you advice on whether repair or replacement is a better choice.

Bynum & Sons Plumbing, Inc.
2120 McDaniels Bridge Rd SW
Lilburn, GA 30047
(770) 736-8283